Travel Plans? Tips for Homeschooling on the Road

You’ve decided to take your vacation late and are embarking on a trip to Seaworld with the kids in tow. The only problem is, school is in session, and though you homeschool, you’re not sure how well it will work while traveling and on vacation. However, you and your family really need to get away for a week, so you’re going. Luckily, it’s not that hard to homeschool when traveling. Read on below for some tips to help you have fun and keep your kids learning at the same time. 

Join a Virtual School 

There are many virtual schools out there today that offer online home school courses. In most cases, the schedules are flexible, but you still get the structure you need. With a virtual school, you can study anywhere that you have the internet or a hot spot, meaning that you can go to Seaworld during the day and have the kids study when they get home that afternoon or vice versa if you prefer. 

Pack Light

In other words, you need to limit the amount of homeschool work you take with you. Limit what school items you take based on what will fit in the kid’s backpack. You’ll also want to take their computers, so they can do classes and worksheets, but remember you’re on vacation so you don’t want to overdo it or feel overwhelmed. 

Remember to Be Flexible 

You’re on vacation, so flexibility is key. You don’t want to have a rigid homeschool schedule while traveling. Kids are less likely to be focused and your structure will soon go out the window. To have a good time and prevent meltdowns, be flexible while you’re on vacation. 

Study the Places You’re Traveling To

You’re traveling so why not take advantage of that to teach the children. If you’re heading to New Hampshire, and you’re driving, why not take advantage of that by studying each state you pass through. Your kids will love it and it won’t feel like they’re studying at all if it’s done the right way. 

Enjoy the Local Food 

Your kids will never be able to learn more hands-on than when you’re on vacation. Take them to the local places to sample the food that locals eat while on vacation. If you want, take them to eat at these local restaurants or markets, then quiz them on the food they ate and what it has to do with that particular area or culture. You’ll have fun and the kids will be learning at the same time. 

Remember, School Doesn’t Have to Take Long 

While brick and mortar schools are typically in class seven to eight hours a day, the same doesn’t hold true for homeschooling. You can have work done in one to three hours, according to what you’re studying and the attention level of the children. Remember here, you’re on vacation, so you’re going to be lax. Take the time to teach them about exercise, history at the local museum, or budgeting and buying groceries at the local store. All of this is teaching them, so if you do it, you’re doing a good job and allowing them to enjoy their vacation at the same time. 

These are just a few tips for continuing to homeschool while you’re on vacation. Remember, homeschooling isn’t like brick and mortar school. You have more possibilities and a much more flexible schedule. The teaching is up to you and you want them to enjoy learning. These tips will help your kids stay in school, but have fun at the same time. 

 

7 Reasons to Tour the the Salk Institute in La Jolla

The Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla California is a world-famous research institute that opened its doors in 1963 under the watchful eye of Jonas Salk, who is credited with developing the first safe and effective polio vaccine. He envisioned it as a collaborative environment where researchers could explore the basic principles of life and contemplate the wider implications of their discoveries.

To design the facility, Salk joined forces with famous architect Louis Kahn and directed him to “create a facility worthy of a visit by Picasso.” And indeed, he did! The Salk Institute remains one of the world’s leading architectural marvels; its spacious, unobstructed laboratory rooms and sharp lines continue to stun architects and tourists alike. World-famous for both architecture and biology, here are seven reasons you need to a book a Salk Institute tour.

1. It’s one of the top biology research facilities in the world.

Nestled in the hills and rocky bluffs of La Jolla California, the Salk Institute has been making impactful discoveries since its completion in 1963. The institute’s major areas of study are aging and regenerative medicine, cancer biology, immune system biology, metabolism and diabetes, neuroscience and neurological disorders, molecular biology, and plant biology. Its cancer center is one of the best in the world.

Salk research provides new understanding and potential treatments for a range of diseases, from AIDS, Parkinson’s Disease, and Alzheimer’s Disease to cancer and cardiovascular disorders. Discoveries by plant biologists are paving the way to improving the quality and quantity of the world’s food supply and to addressing critical environmental problems, including global warming.

2. It has been deemed one of the boldest architectural feats of all time.

Pioneering architect Louis Kahn truly created an architectural marvel. His masterpiece consists of two mirror-image structures — each six stories tall — that flank a grand travertine courtyard. Three floors house laboratories and the three levels above them provide access to utilities. Towers jutting into the courtyard provide study space for senior faculty members. Towers at the east end contain heating, ventilating and other support systems. At the west end are six floors of offices overlooking the Pacific Ocean. In total, the Institute is comprised of 29 different structures.

In July 2017, Salk Institute announced with the Getty Conservation Institute (GCI) that conservation efforts were complete for one of the key architectural elements at the Salk Institute — its gorgeous teak window walls. Now, the teak wood window walls will be protected and maintained for the next 50 years.

3. Research here has already impacted YOU directly.

The Salk Institute was started by Dr. Jonas Salk, the man who developed the first successful polio vaccine. The disease used to be a serious fear as many people, especially children, died of it. Thanks to the work of Dr. Salk, polio is now preventable.

4. Walking the establishment, you’re passing by some of the world’s top minds.

As the scientists and researches come in and out of offices, you never know what groundbreaking projects they’re working on. Research here has provided new understanding and potential treatments for a range of other neurological diseases, from AIDS, Alzheimer’s disease, and Parkinson’s Disease to cancer and cardiovascular disorders. Discoveries by plant biologists and scientists are paving the way to improving the quality and quantity of the world’s food supply and to addressing critical environmental problems, including global warming. Its Center of Excellence in Stem Cells Genomics was created through a $40 million award by California’s stem cells research agency, the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine. It continues to deliver groundbreaking research in the field.

Salk said of his institute, “The Salk Institute is a curious place, not easily understood, and the reason for it is that this is a place in the process of creation. It is being created and is engaged in studies of creation. We cannot be certain what will happen here, but we can be certain it will contribute to the welfare and understanding of man.”

5. You may meet a Nobel Prize Candidate or Nobel Laureate.

One of those very people passing could’ve won or be currently up for a Nobel Prize. To date, the Salk Institute for Biological Studies has produced six Nobel Laureates (including Elizabeth Blackburn and Francis Crick), one National Medal of Science winner, and countless others. View the full list of awards and accolades here.

6. It’s a beautiful spot for lunch.

On the ocean-facing side of the venue sits a small eatery called the CulinArt café; it’s open for lunch Monday-Friday. It’s the perfect place to grab a sandwich and enjoy views of the architecture, San Diego, and Pacific Ocean.

7. The view is unbeatable

The Gliderport is just north of the Salk Institute, so, if the wind’s are right, there’s a good chance you’ll seem some hang gliders or paragliders cruising the sky over the Pacific Ocean and San Diego. During the winter, you may be lucky enough to spot some whales or even dolphins as they make their migration south.

Ready to book your tour? Guided architectural tours are offered at noon Monday through Friday. It’s important to reserve your spot ahead of time; you can do so at the Salk Institute’s Architecture Tour home page.

If you’re interested in more than a tour, the Institute also offers free “Meet-A-Scientist” talks at 11:30am on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. All visitors are welcome, and they’re a great way to gain a more in-depth understanding about the latest scientific discoveries at the Institute with a Salk researcher.